Category Archives: How-to

Open Gov Data talk at Neo4j London User Group

A call for Lightning Talks was sent out to the Neo4j London User Group, so I put in a few ideas and my Open Gov Data proposal was selected above Authentication (and adding extra users) for the March 2017 meetup.

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Neo4j 2.2 Authentication and adding extra users

Token-based authentication is new in Neo4j 2.2, but how does it work?
The first thing to know is that it is enabled by default in conf/neo4j-server.properties by:

# Require (or disable the requirement of) auth to access Neo4j
dbms.security.auth_enabled=true

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Exploring a UK Open Government Dataset with Neo4j

In my first job I was working for a company that developed a management information system for UK Police Forces; this system produced the statutory HMIC (Her Majesty’s Inspectorate of Constabulary) reports and allowed OLAP exploration of the datasets loaded into cubes from the data warehouse tables.

One of the areas that I implemented was the key performance indicators for Road Traffic Collisions, so I was intrigued to discover that the fuller, anonymised STATS19 dataset was now available on data.gov.uk. If you’re interested in the STATS19 form you can see it here.

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Groovy graphs with Grails and Gremlins

This article provides a practical introduction to graph databases with a focus on the Groovy ecosystem. It explores Grails GORM support for Neo4j as well as query comparisons between the Neo4j Cypher language, SQL and the Gremlin graph DSL.

This article originally appeared in the May 2013 issue of GroovyMag.

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Free your mind (map) with Groovy

Freemind is an Open Source mind mapping tool. Version 0.9 (released Feb 2011) introduced Groovy scripting that can be used for processing the mind map nodes. In this article we’ll look at a couple of use cases and the supporting scripts.

This article originally appeared in the February 2013 issue of GroovyMag

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Monitoring elasticsearch

elasticsearch is an open source distributed RESTful search engine built on top of Apache Lucene.
Like any service or component in your architecture, you’ll want to monitor it to ensure that it’s available and gather performance data to help with tuning.

In this brief post, we’ll look at how we can monitor elasticsearch using Opsview, which is built on Nagios and thus has access to a wide range of plugins, yet provides a more approachable user interface for configuring service checks.

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Monitoring OpenStack Swift with Opsview

This is a quick how-to for Opsview users who need to monitor an OpenStack (Essex) Swift installation. As a starting point we’ll perform a ‘front door’ check as this should work no matter what Swift implementation you are using.
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